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Mar 292012
 

Arabic Hard to Learn

Common Arabic Question – Is Arabic hard to Learn?

Some of the most common questions I receive about learning the Arabic language are “Is Arabic hard to Learn?” or “is Arabic easy to learn?”. Arabic has many different factors when it comes to speaking and writing Arabic. Theses factors play an important part and shouldn’t be overlooked.

The two main important factors in language learning difficulty. The first factor deals with the difference between the language you want to learn and your native language. Languages have many properties. English uses the Latin alphabet and has a verb order that puts the subject of a sentence before the verb. Not all languages share these traits.

“Is Arabic hard to learn?” is a question many people ask when thinking about the time invested in becoming fluent in any language is quite large and you want to be sure you can get something out of it in the end.

Arabic hard to learn

The Arabic alphabet is completely different then most Latin based alphabets. The first hurdle for some is getting used to Arabic being written and read from right to left, opposite of English. Arabic letters also change depending on where they are written within the word.

The other major challenge is pronouncing Arabic sounds that don’t appear anywhere in most languages. Arabic uses a lot of sounds produced from the deep throat area of the mouth. For more Information on the Arabic Alphabet

So in the end “is Arabic hard to learn?” It really depends on your exposure to Arabic culture and learning materials. Difficulty of a language is different for each person. What could make Arabic hard to learn for one person, could make it easy for someone else, and vice versa. The only things that really matters when approaching learning any language is your motivation and reason for learning that language.

Interested in further study into Arabic or confused on where to start? I recommend reading our Arabic Beginners Guide or check out the Importance of Languages Store

Mar 112012
 

Arabic Dialects Map

Different Arabic Dialects found in the Middle East and Africa

Within any language or language group there may be significant changes in speech, vocabulary, and pronunciation. The term used to describe these changes is called a dialect. Some words or phrases that exist in one dialect may exist or be absent from a different dialect.

The common dialect in Arabic language is called Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). This dialect is understood or spoken as a second dialect by more than 206 million Arabic-speaking people. MSA is spoken in most formal situations, such as radio broadcasts, lectures and sermons, since it’s one of the most commonly understood Arabic dialects.

Arabic Dialects

Sudanese Arabic – Mostly spoken in the Sudan
Levantine Arabic – This dialect is often heard in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, and western Jordan
Gulf Arabic – Mostly heard throughout the Gulf Coast from Kuwait to Oman
Najdi Arabic – This dialect is most often heard in the desert and oasis areas of central Saudi Arabia
Yemeni Arabic – This dialect is most common to Yemen
Iraqi Arabic – The dialect most commonly spoken in Iraq
Hijazi Arabic – This dialect is spoken in the area west of present-day Saudi Arabia, which is referred to as the Hejaz region.
Egyptian Arabic – This is considered the most widely spoken and understood “second dialect.” It’s mostly heard in Egypt
Maghreb Arabic – Spoken mostly in Algeria, Tunis, Morocco, and western Libya
Hassaniiya Arabic – Most often spoken in Mauritania
Andalusi Arabic – This dialect of the Arabic language is now extinct, but it still holds an important place in literary history.
Maltese Arabic – This form of Arabic dialect is most often found in Malta.

Different Arabic dialects of the Arabic language are spoken in many different nations and regions around northern Africa and the Middle Eastern nations. However, in many areas, the differences in regional dialects may make one Arabic speaker nearly incomprehensible to another. In most cases, the different dialects don’t have a specific written form of the language, but there’s usually a certain amount of literature that accompanies each Arabic dialects, including poetry and plays. This is especially true for Arabic dialects spoken in Egypt and Lebanon.

Interested in further study into Arabic or confused on where to start? I recommend reading our Arabic Beginners Guide or check out the Importance of Languages Store